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Sexual Harassment

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What details do children these days need to know? And how much freedom should headteachers have to decide? The need to improve sex and relationship education in school and at home comes as the number of sexual assaults experienced by children and teenagers from adults and their peers continues to rise. Young people must be taught the importance of healthy and stable relationships, and what exploitative relationships look like. We all know that children, teenagers and young adults experience sexual harassment and violence, and online they are exposed to images and content which can be very disturbing and addictive. Hence, it is vital that schools and parents give children the information they need about sex, consent and healthy relationships. Sex Ed varies from family to family and school to school, so people’s experiences are different. Does sex Ed really fulfill its course name? most of the time, no it does…

Nothing is foolproof, but there are research-proven changes companies could make. To start with, having more women employees, particularly in leadership roles, can reduce the incidence of harassment. Why? It’s not that women are somehow themselves preventing the behavior—in fact women too can be perpetrators—but that male-dominated organizations are more likely to have cultures characterized by aggressive and competitive behaviors and so-called locker-room culture. In addition, compared with women, men tend to have more trouble recognizing when women are being treated in an unfair or sexist way. This sets the stage for harassment: In such contexts, norms of professionalism can give way to boorish interactions in which women are treated as sexualized pawns rather than as valued and competent work colleagues. And if men are less likely to label what their male colleagues are doing as inappropriate, it can make matters worse. What’s more is that in these hyper masculine settings, when women…

“Everyone in my life took my rape as lightly as a brief thunderstorm that might have been frightening when it happened, but was easy to forget about. I adopted that mentality as the foundation of my sex life. I would, time and time again, treat sex as flimsily as it started. I would give it away as if it was cheap, second-hand junk, rather than a prize that deserved to be earned.” – A  Survivor. Many survivors find that their sexual attitudes and reactions are impacted after sexual assault. While these effects are not permanent, they can be very frustrating as they can decrease the enjoyment of one’s sexual life and intimacy with others for some time. Fortunately, even if one does not actively work on sexual healing, as the sexual assault heals, the sexual symptoms will diminish. Experiencing sexual symptoms after sexual assault is not only very common, but…

If you’ve ever had to deal with a workplace sexual harassment complaint, you know how tricky they can be. Sexual harassment in the workplace may be defined as a form of sex/gender discrimination against another that includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. Harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile, toxic or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision. One common element of the federal and most state laws is that an employee must first complain about the harassment. The process of making the sexual harassment complaint is often detailed in an employment or personnel handbook that the employee should have received upon joining the organization. What should a company not do when it receives a sexual harassment complaint? Discipline the Victim of Sexual Harassment Oftentimes, a company’s…