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child-victim

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Dissociation is still a very controversial subject in the field of mental health because it is so routinely equated with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). However, if dissociation is looked at instead as we would any other mental state phenomenon, we will see that all human beings dissociate, and much of our dissociativeness is adaptive. Dissociation is a disconnection between a person’s thoughts, memories, feelings, actions, or sense of who he or she is. This is a normal process that everyone has experienced. Examples of mild, common dissociation include daydreaming, highway hypnosis, or “getting lost” in a book or movie, all of which involve “losing touch” with awareness of one’s immediate surroundings. Tragically, ongoing traumatic conditions such as sexual abuse, community violence, war, or painful medical procedures are not one-time events.  For people repeatedly exposed to these experiences, especially in childhood, dissociation is an extremely effective coping “skill.” However, it can…

Grooming can be defined as the process of desensitization of a victim by a perpetrator in order to make them less likely to reject or report sexual abusive behaviour. Grooming can happen when there is a power differential within a relationship, which the abuser exploits for their own gratification. This is most commonly recognized as a tactic used by paedophiles, both on children and parents. However, adults can also be groomed. Grooming may also include threats or bribes, which persuade the child or young person that it would be impossible to ask for help. Child grooming Age difference is one example of a power differential. Children are taught to respect older children and adults – many abusers take advantage of this. Someone who was groomed as a child might find it hard to accept that what happened to them was ‘abuse’. The abuser may have taken an interest in them…

There has been extensive studies on the adverse effects of childhood sexual trauma which shows that exposure to initial traumatic experiences—and the resulting emotional dysregulation and loss of safety, direction, and the ability to detect or respond to danger cues—often sets off a chain of events leading to subsequent or repeated trauma exposure in adolescence and adulthood.. It is highly important for everyone to take major precautions towards protecting their children from childhood sexual abuse and/or other forms of complex trauma, such as  child maltreatment—including psychological maltreatment, neglect, physical abuse, and domestic violence; it is equally important to seek immediate intervention on discovering that a child has been victimized in order to prevent long term effects, the sooner the better. The whole purpose of these materials is to wake people up to the reality of sexual violence and motivate everyone to become part of the solution. In this talk, Dr Nadine…